Colorado Informed

A Civic Information Project

Countdown to Election Day

Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
Polls close at 7pm! Get in line by 7pm! Drop-off ballots must be received TODAY no later than 7pm. Overseas ballots must be received by Nov. 16.

A Civic Information Project

Countdown to Election Day

Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
Polls close at 7pm! Get in line by 7pm! Drop-off ballots must be received TODAY no later than 7pm. Overseas ballots must be received by Nov. 16.Voting Has Ended!

A Civic Information Project

Countdown to Election Day

Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
Polls close at 7pm! Get in line by 7pm! Drop-off ballots must be received TODAY no later than 7pm. Overseas ballots must be received by Nov. 16.

VOTING MADE EASY

Simple and secure.

We strive to educate you on the facts and make your voting experience as seamless as possible. We’ve created straightforward tools to explain the Colorado voting process and help you better understand your options.

 
Key Dates
  • October 16 – Ballots start to get mailed to eligible voters and 24-hour Ballot Drop Box locations open in Colorado
  • October 23 – Voter Service and Polling Centers open with a phased approach spanning through Election Day. Click on your county to get the latest details on locations and timing.
  • October 30 – Last day a voter may request a ballot be sent by mail. After October 31st, all newly registered voters must obtain their ballot at an in-person voting center. All mail-in ballots originating in the United States must be received by November 8th to be counted.
  • November 7 – General Election Day from 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. / Polls close at 7 p.m. including all Ballot Drop Box Locations and Voter Service and Polling Centers. Voters must be in line or have by 7pm to be able to vote.
  • November 15 – Deadline to receive military and overseas ballots.
  • To learn more key dates, visit the Colorado Secretary of State Election Calendar.

Did You Know?

  • What’s the best way for you to vote in Colorado? Take this quick survey to find out!
  • State and federal laws require that every polling place be accessible for those with disabilities.
  • Colorado is one of three states to receive top marks for voting and election confidence in a recent study by the Democracy Initiative Education fund.
Voting Tools

Key Dates

  • October 16 – Ballots start to get mailed to eligible voters and 24-hour Ballot Drop Box locations open in Colorado
  • October 23 – Voter Service and Polling Centers open with a phased approach spanning through Election Day. Click on your county to get the latest details on locations and timing.
  • October 30 – Last day a voter may request a ballot be sent by mail. After October 31st, all newly registered voters must obtain their ballot at an in-person voting center. All mail-in ballots originating in the United States must be received by November 8th to be counted.
  • November 7 – General Election Day from 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. / Polls close at 7 p.m. including all Ballot Drop Box Locations and Voter Service and Polling Centers. Voters must be in line or have by 7pm to be able to vote.
  • November 15 – Deadline to receive military and overseas ballots.
  • To learn more key dates, visit the Colorado Secretary of State Election Calendar.

Did You Know?

  • What’s the best way for you to vote in Colorado? Take this quick survey to find out!
  • State and federal laws require that every polling place be accessible for those with disabilities.
  • Colorado is one of three states to receive top marks for voting and election confidence in a recent study by the Democracy Initiative Education fund.
Voting Tools

FEATURED VOTING PROFILES

While we hope every eligible Colorado voter will exercise their right to vote, here are some easy tips for three voter profiles who historically have encountered additional obstacles.

Student

Veteran

Spanish-Speaking

VOTING MADE EASY

Did You Know?

  • What’s the best way for you to vote in Colorado? Take this quick survey to find out!
  • State and federal laws require that every polling place be accessible for those with disabilities.
  • Colorado is one of three states to receive top marks for voting and election confidence in a recent study by the Democracy Initiative Education fund.
  • If you’re 17 on the date of a primary election, presidential primary election or caucus and will be eighteen years of age on the date of the next general election, you are entitled to vote in the primary election, presidential primary election, or caucus.
  • Under Colorado law, voters may get time off without loss of pay if he/she does not have sufficient time outside of regular working hours to vote.
  • Voters who are in line at their polling location by 7:00 PM are allowed to vote no matter how long it takes for each person to cast his or her ballot.
  • Many polling places have poll watchers assigned to observe the voting process? Poll watchers are certified by political parties, unaffiliated candidates, and proponents and opponents of ballot questions. For more information please see our Watchers FAQ.
  • Can a post office box be used as a mailing address for voter registration purposes? Yes. Post office boxes are ONLY acceptable as a mailing address. Meaning, that if a homeless voter uses a physical location that does not have a mailing address (such as a park), he/she may provide a post office as a mailing address. Post office boxes, however, are NEVER acceptable for residence purposes.
  • Ballottrax offers a simple, secure, online signup that uses barcode data to offer complete visibility into tracking your mail-in ballot’s location and status – your vote remains confidential. The updates are available by text, email, voice  for complete transparency in the voters choice of delivery, language, and timing.
  • If you are homeless, permanently reside in a recreational vehicle (RV), or for whatever reason have no fixed permanent address, you may use any address that you regularly return to and have the intent to remain. This location is referred to as a “home base” (residential address) and may be used for voter registration purposes.
  • While a voter may use any physical location as a residence, he/she cannot be registered to vote without providing a valid mailing address.

Student

A voter is considered a resident of Colorado when they’re registered with the department of motor vehicles or paying state income tax. This applies to new-to-Colorado students and out-of-state students who want to maintain residency in Colorado. Here are a few steps to ensure your experience is seamless and your vote is securely captured and counted.

 

  1. For Colorado residents attending school out of state who intend to keep Colorado as their permanent home for motor vehicle and income tax purposes, register as a Colorado voter and make sure your voter registration is up-to-date with your out-of-state mailing address. Your residential address is your Colorado home address. Check your current voter registration status here by entering your name, zip code and date of birth to make sure everything is up to date.
  2. If you’re not already, register online and then report back to complete this survey on the best way for you to vote. Coloradans may register in person or online to vote through Election Day.
  3. To receive a ballot in the mail, you must be registered by Oct. 31, and you will have to return it to a drop box or voting center by 7pm on November 7th.
  4. Ballots will be mailed to all registered voters starting October 16th.
  5. Colorado produces a Ballot Information Booklet to provide voters with an impartial analysis of everything on the ballot.
  6. If you’re voting by mail, you may also need to provide a photocopy of your identification when you return your mail ballot. View acceptable forms of identification here.
  7. You have three secure options to deliver your ballot. You can put it in the USPS mail, deliver it to a drop box location, or visit a local polling center. Click on your county to view the dropboxes and polling centers available in your neighborhood.
  8. You can also track your ballot through BallotTrax to receive a phone message, email and/or text when your ballot is sent, received, and counted.
  9. If you have an issue with your mail ballot, you can use the TXT2Cure system from your mobile phone to submit the additional information necessary to resolve the problem and ensure your vote is counted. Learn more about the TXT2Cure system here.

 

For more information:
If you have any other questions regarding voting, please feel free to reach out to learn more:

  1. Secretary of State-Election Division:
    Telephone: (303) 894-2200 ext. 6343
    Email: State.ElectionDivision@coloradosos.gov
  2. Alternatively, for the most up to date election information, visit GoVoteColorado.gov or feel free to reach out to your county clerk with any election-related issues.
  3. With Accessible Voting, you may have additional voting options. Learn if you’re eligible to return a ballot electronically .

Veteran

Veterans understand firsthand the importance of protecting our democracy. One of the most effective ways to protect democracy, aside from being on the front lines, is to exercise your right to vote and ensure your vote is counted and secure. We want to make sure the voting process is as easy, seamless and safe as possible to ensure your voice is heard. We’ve compiled the survey above to help you determine the best way for you to vote. Please note that state and federal laws require that every polling place be Accessible for those with disabilities. If your polling place is not accessible, make your local election office aware of any issues. If you have any other questions regarding voting, please feel free to reach out to learn more:

  1. Secretary of State-Election Division: Telephone: (303) 894-2200 ext. 6343 Email: State.ElectionDivision@coloradosos.gov
  2. Alternatively, for the most up to date election information, visit GoVoteColorado.gov or feel free to reach out to your county clerk with any election-related issues.
With Accessible Voting, you may have additional voting options. Learn if you’re eligible to return a ballot electronically

Spanish-Speaking

A pillar of the United States is to provide a pathway for every voice to be heard during our nation’s elections, regardless of whether that voice speaks Spanish, English, or any other language. To ensure that Colorado’s Hispanic communities have a pathway to exercise this fundamental right, we’ve outlined a number of resources to ensure you have access to a ballot that you are able to comprehend and understand. Both a Spanish language sample ballot and in-person Spanish language ballot are available at many Colorado Voter Service and Polling Centers and online via your County Election Office’s website. Based on the most recent census data, the following counties are required to provide Spanish ballot access: Adams, Alamosa, Arapahoe, Bent, Boulder, Conejos,Costilla, D Senver, Eagle, El Paso, Fremont, Garfield, Jefferson, Lincoln, Montrose, Morgan, Prowers, Rio Grande, Saguache and Weld. We recommend taking the “What’s the best way for me to vote” survey above to learn more about your options. If you have any other questions regarding voting, please feel free to reach out to learn more:

  1. Secretary of State-Election Division: Telephone: (303) 894-2200 ext. 6343 Email: State.ElectionDivision@coloradosos.gov
  2. Alternatively, for the most up to date election information, visit GoVoteColorado.gov or feel free to reach out to your county clerk with any election-related issues.
  3. With Accessible Voting, you may have additional voting options. Learn if you’re eligible to return a ballot electronically.